I started this week looking at the origins of this journalistic moment in Ferguson, which took me into a story about & , which led me right back to James Bennet & . Here it is
This from ’s excellent column unnerves me: “American view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment,” [Loury tweeted]. “We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”
It really speaks volumes that this piece, which hails the shift in journalistic practices that occurred after Michael Brown's shooting, doesn't even mention that the media narrative about this incident was later shown by the DOJ to be entirely fictional.
It's wrong to characterize the current media debates as about journalism that's more "personal" or partisan. Disproportionately white newsrooms failed to cover racism objectively. What is happening now is a course correction towards...the facts.
America’s 75 year experiment in non-partisan media is over.
“Walking in circles, and then realizing later on that it was simply an unconstitutional rule, it changed the way I thought about reporting — it made me think I have to question everything, including the rules of our reporting.” — ⁦
“But the shift in mainstream American media — driven by a journalism that is more personal, and reporters more willing to speak what they see as the truth without worrying about alienating conservatives — now feels irreversible.”
This is similar to how journalists like and were radicalized by the financial crisis. When you discover that the sources you’ve been trusting have just straight-up been lying to you, that changes your view profoundly.
"News organizations’ 'core value needs to be the truth, not the perception of objectivity.'" Amen.
Those of us whose careers were forged on the streets of Ferguson have never forgotten what we saw, and we are forever bonded by the experience. I will also be forever grateful to every brave soul who shared their stories with me there.
A retweet that is an endorsement: “We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”
Big new column: "The shift in mainstream American media — driven by a journalism that is more personal, and reporters more willing to speak what they see as the truth without worrying about alienating conservatives — now feels irreversible."
"It made me think I have to question everything." Ferguson as crucible for journalists like , and for us all. By
“But the shift in mainstream American media — driven by a journalism that is more personal, and reporters more willing to speak what they see as the truth without worrying about alienating conservatives — now feels irreversible.”
“the shift in mainstream American media — driven by a journalism that is more personal, and reporters more willing to speak what they see as the truth without worrying about alienating conservatives — now feels irreversible.”
apology accepted,
Going to tweet this again: “view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment”
He has changed the way we understand & report on policing in America, and forced the industry forward. I learn from him every day and we can all learn from his insistence on centering our reporting on a sense of moral clarity, especially as we cover race.
“American view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment. We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”
Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms. If you follow me and read my work, you have to click.
One iconic story of newsroom tensions in this moment ins & Martin Baron. The full story, and blunt internal memos, are here:
This piece is getting widely praised and deservedly so -- it really helps explain the paradigm shift in journalism.
Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms Staff members’ demands helped end the tenure of James Bennet as Opinion editor of the NYT. And they are generating tension at Washington Post. Part of the story starts in Ferguson. reports
yeah the policy where every journalist who's not a white man is disallowed from publicly advocating for their own equality is and has been garbage
Fantastic column about the cohort of journalists who flew to Ferguson and came back to transform journalism.
There are some great interviews here some of the black journalists who have done crucial work for the profession in pushing their newsrooms to be more objective, and more accurate, in their coverage of racism in America
An important and timely column from ⁦⁩ on a subject that has been keeping my group texts extra spicy this week.
Amazing that this bit of analysis links to was written just a few short years ago. “YA CAN’T MAKE IT UP”
Shorter version: “We don’t like your opinions and we’re done talking about them in a way that even pretends to be objective.” Man, I wonder why conservatives have so many issues with the mainstream media?
So, who is gonna write about how White and mostly male the media beat is? From the media reporters to the media columnists? What wrote about is only the beginning. More needs to come
“I look at everything differently, and would never do that again,” Scarborough told me of his 2014 exchange with . “I should have kept my mouth shut.”
Under ideal conditions, with infinite time, full transparency, and perfect reasoning powers, journalism should present every possibility. But in the actual world, both siderism is epistemically irresponsible. Journalism must focus on truth.
I was in college during Ferguson and seeing all the young black reporters lead that coverage was motivating. Thank you for speaking up then and continuing to use your voice now to push the industry forward 🙏🏽
Re AM Rosenthal: “The words, ‘He kept the paper straight,’ are inscribed on his gravestone.” I wish had mentioned that Rosenthal was a notorious hater of gay people who “kept the paper straight” at the height of the AIDS crisis.
. media columnist responds to his paper's self-immolation with column pinning a target on the editor of rival . Nobody said isn't a slick customer!
I’d be fascinated to know where thinks this all ends up
This piece chronicles an important moment. I think the most enduring aspect will be the impact of what identifies as “journalism’s business model, relying increasingly on passionate readers willing to pay for content.”
I interacted with Wesley Lowery on Twitter over race-crime statistics until he blocked me. Basically, he's a not terribly bright or well-informed mostly white affirmative action hire. His racist bigotry is less due to malice than lack of intelligence.
“In this case, we messed up and hiding behind, ‘We want to keep the paper straight,’ to not acknowledge that, would have left us more exposed,” Mr. Sulzberger said.
.'s "view that news organizations’ “core value needs to be the truth, not the perception of objectivity ... has been winning in a series of battles, many around how to cover race."
Provocative column. For me, attempting to be objective doesn’t mean adhering to “both-sides journalism.” But more than one approach can live in newspapers. In modern Opinion pages, I’d rather read more reported columns from people w/ points of view.
Essa coluna mostra como o jornalismo brasileiro está a anos-luz de discutir questões relevantes sobre o ofício com transparência. E como os repórteres aqui têm menos voz que nos EUA: Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms
This piece by about reporters feeling their oats in the post-Ferguson world makes one thing clear: They are coming for Marty Baron at the WP.
"Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms"
Shout it from the rooftops: "American view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment...We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”
Illuminating story by ⁦⁩ which starts in Ferguson to explain the moment of journalistic tension we find ourselves in
So anyone that disagrees with the political program of liberal newspaper reporters lacks "moral clarity"? Do these people not see the problem here? Or are they that convinced of their own righteousness?
"Minutes after Mr. Sulzberger told the staff in an email that Mr. Bennet had resigned, he told me not to interpret the move as a philosophical shift. "
I fully understand the view in newsrooms that you should not cover Trump, you should fight him. I really do. What I don’t understand is why the reporters saying this then seem shocked when Trump regards them as opponents
Finally, reporters see management responding to online mobs, without understanding what's going on. Ginsberg & a Post spokeswoman didn't respond to my emails about it. (I mentioned the report in passing in my column, where they also declined to comment )
Revolts erupting in big newsrooms as journalists confront lack of #diversity and how #racism is covered, by via #journalism #BlackLivesMatter
Black journalists who covered Ferguson & use Twitter to comment on their news outlets are leading internal movements to shift news standards toward less concern for objectivity & more for moral clarity
A question for all newsrooms: “When an organization loses a journalist as talented and as fiercely committed to the truth as Wesley Lowery, its leaders need to ask themselves why,” said . “We need more reporters like him, not fewer.”
Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms - The New York Times
Always read , in this case on the transformation of journalism and the coverage of race in America since Ferguson, and the ripple effects ever since
Gaaaah, the piece I'm writing is all about this stuff.
+1000 ... news organizations’ “core value needs to be the truth, not the perception of objectivity,” #media
.⁦⁩: US newsrooms are seeking common ground between a tradition that aims to persuade the widest possible audience that its reporting is neutral and journalists who believe that fairness on issues from race to Trump requires clear moral calls.
“American view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment,” he tweeted of the Times debacle. “We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”
My guess is that, under the rubric of racial virtue, the NYT is about to lead old media into the digital rhetoric of the rant - at this point, not much of a transformation...
“Generations of black journalists, including here at The Washington Post, have served as the conscience not only of their publications but of our entire industry,” — quoted by
This is a terrifying view of journalism. “view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment...We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.”(via ) #longreads
Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s Big Newsrooms
Link to full article, all of it recommended
Quite an extraordinary piece on the politics of journalism and reporting on policing and race issues in current climate. via
Even those who, as ’s piece reports, reject a newspapers’ obligation of journalistic objectivity & think news organizations’ “core value needs to be the truth” (& not a humble search for it) should at least be troubled by that particular tactic. 11/
"Mr. Lowery’s view that news organizations’ 'core value needs to be the truth, not the perception of objectivity,' … has been winning … big outlets have gradually, awkwardly, given ground, using 'racist' and 'lie' more freely"
2/ “I look at everything differently, and would never do that again,” Mr. Scarborough told me of his 2014 exchange with Mr. Lowery. “I should have kept my mouth shut.”' Excellent tour d'horizon by
Fascinating analysis by of how generational change, the incentives of Twitter, a diversifying newsroom, and less of a reliance on advertising is transforming journalism to become more personal and less concerned with balancing opposing viewpoints.
“American view-from-nowhere, ‘objectivity’-obsessed, both-sides journalism is a failed experiment,” tweeted of the debacle. “We need to rebuild our industry as one that operates from a place of moral clarity.” Via
Strange essay from on the newsroom revolts. Smith traces the recent revival of racially conscious advocacy reporting (of which he seems to approve) back to Ferguson 2014, but doesn't acknowledge that much of that reporting turned out to be wrong