After a drastic decline this spring, global greenhouse gas emissions are now rebounding sharply — a stark reminder that even as the pandemic rages, the world is still far from getting global warming under control.
In early April, daily fossil CO₂ emissions worldwide were 17% lower than they were in 2019, but by mid-June emissions had ticked up to just 5% below. Any drop in emissions was always likely to be temporary unless countries took concerted action...
“We still have the same cars, the same power plants, the same industries that we had before the pandemic. Without big structural changes, emissions are likely to come back.” latest data on CO2 emissions now in the
After a drastic decline this spring, global greenhouse gas emissions are now rebounding sharply, scientists reported, as countries relax their coronavirus lockdowns and traffic surges back onto roads
“We still have the same cars, the same power plants, the same industries that we had before the pandemic,” said Corinne Le Quéré, a climate scientist at the University of East Anglia. “Without big structural changes, emissions are likely to come back.”
But by mid-June, as countries eased their lockdowns, emissions had ticked up to just 5% below the 2019 average, the authors estimated in a recent update
In early April, daily fossil fuel emissions worldwide were roughly 17% lower than they were in 2019, according to a study published in May in Nature Climate Change
After a drastic decline this spring, global greenhouse gas emissions are now rebounding sharply — a stark reminder that even as the pandemic rages, the world is still far from getting global warming under control.
“We still have the same cars, the same power plants, the same industries that we had before the pandemic,” said Corinne Le Quéré, a climate scientist at the University of East Anglia. “Without big structural changes, emissions are likely to come back.”
We need to #BuildBackBetter, not #BringBackFailure #ClimateEmergency
The study’s authors said they were surprised by how quickly emissions had rebounded. But, they added, any drop in fossil fuel use related to the coronavirus was always likely to be temporary unless countries took concerted action.
Emissions Are Surging Back as Countries and States Reopen
Emissions Are Surging Back as Countries and States Reopen
This #pandemic could have been a #portal to a different world but #humangreed is insatiable alas. via
Emissions Are Surging Back as Countries and States Reopen - The New York Times
via After a drastic decline this spring, global greenhouse gas emissions are now rebounding sharply, ......It’s a stark reminder that even as the pandemic rages, the world is still far from getting global warming under control.
🙁🦠Emissions Are Surging Back as Countries and States Reopen - The New York Times
Too few micro economists work on the climate change adaptation challenge. In Spring 2021, will publish my new book "Adapting to Climate Change" that applies Gary Becker's and Robert Lucas's logic to the climate change challenge.
You know how the pandemic cut greenhouse gas emissions? They're back.
As #lockdowns around the world end for #COVID19 mitigation #CO2 carbon dioxide emissions are soaring.
pandemic data is the final nail in the coffin in the debate about whether "personal sacrifice" does anything substantial for global warming. when you have personal sacrifice without any government action and investment, emissions just keep going up and up
What a natural experiment. Could give us real additional insight on the consequences of GHG emissions ⁦
Global fossil fuel emissions dropped by 17% early April compared to 2019. By mid June, the drop was only 5%. Global CO2 emissions recovering fast as confinement eases Original paper
After a drastic decline this spring, global GHG emissions are rebounding sharply as countries relax coronavirus lockdowns. A stark reminder that even as the pandemic rages, the world is far from getting #climtechange under control. via
"After a drastic decline this spring, global greenhouse gas emissions are now rebounding sharply as countries relax their coronavirus lockdowns and traffic surges back onto roads."