🚨I wrote about the mental and emotional toll that the pandemic is taking on public health experts, who’ve been running on fumes for months, and who are deeply frustrated with shouting empirical advice into a political void. 1/
God, am I so happy that wrote this. Many of us from the AIDS era (not over!) have PTSD from it. All the deaths, the needless suffering. And here we go again. 1/
We're only half a year into this pandemic — closer to the beginning than the end, likely, unfortunately — and public health experts are exhausted. Terrific story from .
"I always feel like I'm never doing enough." America's public-health experts are tired, drained, and frustrated about shouting advice into a political void, reports.
Hooooo yeah--great piece by . Everyone is burned out, exacerbated by dealing w/denial & outright harassment. We'd also love for things to be "back to normal", but know that won't happen w/o work on everyone's part. It's demoralizing.
That’s made worse by online trolls, social-distancing culture wars, the new predictable surge in cases, & America’s cavalier fatalism. “It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire.” - 4/
No one wants to be right. “One of the big misconceptions is that we enjoy being right. We’d be very happy to be wrong, because it would mean lives are being saved.” - 5/
“It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire.” [email protected] Yet another essential, compassionate piece by at .
So, for everyone who felt seen after reading this burnout piece, and who's stretched to the limits right now, I put it to you that you never know how your work and actions ripple outwards. 7/
There’s the physical toll of relentless work & little sleep. There’s also the psych burden of working in preparedness—constantly staring at society’s vulnerabilities, imagining the worst futures, and worst of all, seeing those futures come to pass. 3/
This is also a tangentially personal piece. A lot of what the sources have. voiced—frustration about shouting into the void; wanting to not be right; “I always feel like I’m never doing enough”—let’s just say it’s not unfamiliar.
Public-health—and especially the folks who specialize in pandemic threats—is not a big field. There’s only so much expertise to go around, and it’s not infinite. This will all be much worse if the people trying to make it better can’t cope. 7/
Read this piece by . I feel seen. With many thoughtful comments from a top tier group of colleagues (and some friends) who I deeply respect: , , , , , , .
This is a beautiful piece by featuring the incredible work being done by and echoing the experiences of so many working working on this pandemic.
"I always feel like I'm never doing enough." America's public-health experts are tired, drained, and frustrated about shouting advice into a political void, reports.
"America isn’t just facing a shortfall of testing kits, masks, or health-care workers. It is also looking at a drought of expertise, as the very people whose skills are sorely needed to handle the pandemic are on the verge of burning out." via
A few people responded to this piece about public-health burnout with some variant of "It's not just them; [climate scientists/conservationists/etc.] have felt this way for years." And yes! I agree! Consider this the latest in an unofficial series... 1/
I’ve seen public-health folks caricatured as finger-wagging ivory-tower alarmists, distinct from the everyday ppl affected by their advice. False. Dichotomy. The experts I spoke to going through it all, feeling trapped at home, missing their families. 6/
These folks are used by now to sharing expertise w/ journalists; less so to talking about themselves. I wanted to find out what they’re going through. Many told me they’re honored to be able to help. But many are also close to burning out. 2/
Our public health experts are suffering too #harassment #mentalhealth #burnout So grateful covers this. And thank you for "First, don’t ignore your feelings: 'Your anxiety, fear & anger are all real.' Then, find your people."
"I could sleep for two weeks and still feel this tired. It’s embedded in us at this point."
A(nother) superb article from featuring some people I knew before the pandemic, others I have 'met' in the last few months, and others I have yet to meet. All are wonderful and worthy of your deep gratitude
"I always feel like I'm never doing enough." America's public-health experts are tired, drained, and frustrated about shouting advice into a political void, reports.
I'm putting my head back down today because the work is soothing... I'll wait to unpack this trauma sometime in the future. I appreciated this piece by which spoke to how I'm feeling. Maybe it will speak to you. Take care of yourselves.
Thanks for credit to many excellent public health leaders and perfect summary by "Because of poor political decisions that every public-health person I know disagreed with, everything that could go wrong did go wrong”
We are all exhausted by now. And it is not over yet.
This piece by ⁦⁩ was so hard to read—so much pain, so much truth. Huge shoutout to my colleagues, we’ll get through this. The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay - The Atlantic
We're in for a generation-defining PTSD event. 's work is essential as always
First, in the piece () only academics are quoted. There’s not one quote from one governmental public health practitioner. discusses “health officials” late in the piece but it is not clear who those are. 2/7
If you haven't already, thank your Infection Preventionist today! #WeLoveOurIPs
A few months ago, the US "still seemed to have a chance of controlling Covid-19,” as writes. “It didn’t. Instead, to the immense frustration of public-health advisers, leaders rushed to reopen while most states were still woefully unprepared.”
The public health experts I've spoken with while reporting on covid are some of the most unfailingly helpful and dedicated people I've ever interviewed and I feel bad that they have so many Twitter followers now, among many other indignities.
Pandemic experts are burned out. Juggling rapid COVID research work with our teams, direct advisory roles to governments, media commitments, sharing insights across countries with each other & the usual academic load.
Public health specialists are demoralized, burnt out. A research professor at Georgetown tells “it feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire.”
My friends, epidemiologists and virologists, public health nerds, ICU docs are tired, exhausted. Sad we can’t do more —today over 60,000 Americans got COVID. One of every 3 in the world. Other countries ban us as disease carriers. No, we are not ok.
We're all tired. But public health experts are very, very tired. A heartbreaker from
"Her phone is now a miserable metronome, ticking out the rhythm of the pandemic ever more rapidly as Arizona’s cases climb. 'It has almost become white noise.'" from
Don't EVEN get me started! has been working around the clock since the beginning of the year. I am grateful for these public health heroes every day. We must take care of ourselves and one another in order to survive the months ahead.
For those who’ve been asking if I’m ok, read this by . 🙏🏼 The reason it’s been hard (for me) is that well-meaning virologists, engineers, etc. miss the critical difference between individual health and public health
A fantastic piece on the prevention paradox and the impact it is having on #publichealth experts - damned if you do, damned if you don’t . ⁦⁩ recently also shared the vitriolic/sexist attacks she is subjected to #COVIDー19 #healthworkers
Hard to read this article. Sending it out to all my public health colleagues who have been at this since January...
“there’s no feasible thing that anyone could do to make this better, no matter how much they love you.” Big thanks to for this compassionate look at the pandemic’s unspoken toll on public health experts. We owe these experts everything.
"[...] they’re demoralized about repeatedly shouting evidence-based advice into a political void. “It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire [...]”". 🙏
“One of the big misconceptions is that we enjoy being right. We’d be very happy to be wrong, b/c it would mean lives are being saved.” Great story . Everyone in science/med is bone-tired, & this is at the heart of it. #COVID19
Nothing says Wednesday like a twitter rant, so here goes...I have read 's piece - The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay (). It is very good. People like and have praised it, but some things were left out. 1/7
“They’re demoralized about repeatedly shouting evidence-based advice into a political void. “It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire,” Carlson says.” Another must-read from :
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay - Many American public-health specialists are at risk of burning out as the coronavirus surges back.
“It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire.”
Public health experts "are not OK" this deep into the pandemic, beset by frustration and fatigue. So true for those of us studying long-term care. How can you stay inspired when the population with 45% of COVID-19 deaths continues to be neglected?
If you haven't already, thank your Infection Preventionist today! #WeLoveOurIPs
This is on the mark. Thank you Ed Yong for covering this!
🇺🇸 "A pandemic would have always been a draining ordeal. But it is especially so because the U.S., instead of mounting a unified front, is disjointed, cavalier, and fatalistic." Important cris de coeurs from public health experts. By , natch.
Wise words, . "First, don’t ignore your feelings: “Your anxiety, fear, and anger are all real,” he said. Then, find your people."
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay - The Atlantic
This article1000% "The field of PH demands a particular way of thinking. Unlike medicine, which is about saving individual patients, PH is about protecting the well-being of entire communities...[It] is not a calling for people who crave the limelight."
The pandemic experts are not okay. Many public health specialists are at risk of burning out as #coronavirus surges back, by via #COVID19
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay - Great piece by ⁦⁩ about the stress of being a [female] public health expert whose advice is largely ignored. Well...
"[Experts are] demoralized about repeatedly shouting evidence-based advice into a political void. “It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin & then setting the napkin on fire.” Another great piece by #COVID19 #SARSCoV2
“One of the big misconceptions is that we enjoy being right,” Louissaint said. “We’d be very happy to be wrong, because it would mean lives are being saved.”
Likely we are still very early in the pandemic. But the first months of the pandemic were very hard work for public health experts and haven taken their toll on many of them as ⁦⁩ reports.
Must-read: "I always feel like I'm never doing enough." America's public-health experts are tired, drained, and frustrated about shouting advice into a political void, reports.
Thanks for taking time to talk to all of us and writing this important piece. I feel lucky to be included with so many great colleagues , , , , , , .
⁩ I’m so thrilled ⁦⁩ highlighted you! “They’re not treating sick people..but are instead advising policy makers, monitoring pandemic’s movements, modeling its likely trajectory, & ensuring that hospitals are ready”1/
“I can say something and get horrendously attacked, but a man who doesn’t even work in this field can go on national TV and be revered for saying the exact same thing,” #EpiWomen live through COVID-19.
#PublicHealth experts are tired & dispirited by America’s continued inability to control a virus that many other nations have brought to a heel. As the pandemic once again intensifies, so too does their frustration & fatigue. By
Which makes me extra-worried about the public-health burnout I wrote about here. Expertise is not an infinite resource. It exists in people--a surprisingly small number of people, who are already exhausted. 5/
Public health experts are demoralized about repeatedly shouting evidence-based advice into a political void. “It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire."
Thank you for this. We are all tired.
Another great #COVID19 #pandemic piece featuring many colleagues: "I always feel like I'm never doing enough." America's #publichealth experts are tired, drained, and frustrated about shouting advice into a political void.
It's a tough time out there for those in #publichealth. "The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay." from is quoted. #COVID19 #pandemic
A MUST READ via : Many American public-health specialists are at risk of burning out as the coronavirus surges back. #Pandemic #Scientists #Disasterologists #Burnout #CoronavirusAffects #PublicHealth
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay 🦠🇺🇸🔥
Full of insight and truth: “One of the big misconceptions is that we enjoy being right,” Louissaint said. “We’d be very happy to be wrong, because it would mean lives are being saved.”
“It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire,” [said Colin Carlson, who specializes in infectious diseases]
for some of us, this is the second time dealing with this kind of phenomenon. for others, the third or more. worth reading. and importantly, there are ways to survive this ....with dignity, optimism, and a new tribe... .
This is why I am sick of the vitriol on twitter. I get called names & sent racist and nasty DMs. I have been working nonstop on #COVID19 & people forget that as science changes so do our recommendations. This is why journalists write stories like this
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay: Many American public-health specialists are at risk of burning out as the #coronavirus surges back. via
A susurrus of Sisyphi
Many researchers have suddenly pivoted to COVID-19, producing sloppy work with harmful results. That further dispirits more cautious researchers, who...
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay Many American public-health specialists are at risk of burning out as the coronavirus surges back.
We’re tired but we feel a great sense of duty. We thought it would be a sprint but it’s turned into an ultramarathon.
The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay - The Atlantic
Great piece and quotes from humanizing public health amidst the chaos—really special people for sure. Be good to those giving endlessly in public sector. It’s important.
"The pandemic is also bringing out academia’s darker sides—competition, hostility, sexism, and a lust for renown. Armchair experts from unrelated fields have successfully positioned themselves as trusted sources. Male scientists ar…
“Within our public-health bubble, we were getting nervous, but then you walked outside and it was like Pleasantville. People thought we had conquered it, and now it feels like we’re drowning.”
“It feels like writing ‘Bad things are about to happen’ on a napkin and then setting the napkin on fire,” Carlson says.
Public health experts never crave for limelight.. now they are worried and exhausted fighting the #COVID19 and misconceptions
#Publichealth & infectious disease experts are tired, and ‘dispirited by America’s inability to control a virus that many other countries have brought to heel.’ 😔 #WearAMask, please!
I am not even an expert, I'm definitely getting more than 4 hours of sleep a night. And yet I feel so seen
This story coincides nicely with the debut of the profession's new motto, "scream inside your heart"