Among the alarming points of reality noted here — Last Friday, the Nueces County Medical Examiner - in Texas’ Coastal Bend - was shocked to learn that a baby boy, less than 6 months old, had tested positive for COVID-19 and died shortly after.
Important story about what's happening in Texas. Early in the pandemic hotspots were driven by meatpacking plants and nursing homes. Now hotspots are emerging where people are vacationing and socializing. The new emerging spot is coastal bend area.
As of last week, the White House Coronavirus Task Force designated almost half of Texas’ 254 counties as coronavirus “red zones,” according to a report obtained by .
Viruses don’t care if you believe in them
Experts say instead of large clusters tied to specific, enclosed locations in Texas, like meatpacking plants or nursing homes, they are increasingly seeing smaller outbreaks out in the community.
So much of Texas is battling major coronavirus outbreaks that the hot spots keep moving. Areas affected early, like Amarillo, are eclipsed by new regions in crisis, like South Texas. There's a lot in here. By
Evolution of TX hot spots: May: Amarillo hit due to prisons & meatpacking plants. Plenty of capacity elsewhere to handle overflow patients. July: South Texas hit due to tourists & small gatherings. A patient had to fly 700 miles for a hospital bed.
A dystopian reality outside Texas’s major metro areas
We reported that last Friday, Nueces County Medical Examiner Adel Shaker was shocked to learn that a baby boy, less than 6 months old, had tested positive for COVID-19 and died shortly after.
A patient’s journey of some 700 miles highlights the urgency of the coronavirus pandemic in South Texas hospitals — and the huge variations across the sprawling state, where the scale of COVID-19 outbreaks varies as much from city to city as the climate.
With 4 in 5 Texans living in a "red zone," coronavirus hot spots are moving targets via
Whether its remote workers, the next HQ2, or smaller business location decisions, folks are going to look at hotspots like this and say no thanks.
Texas coronavirus hot spots are moving targets | The Texas Tribune