Do you ever stop and wonder if Cormac McCarthy's vision of the American future just wasn't grim enough
For workers, it's a contractor's precarity without a contractor's independence. Which brings me to Amazon drivers hanging cellphones from tree-branches. 6/
Truly, 's story on Amazon delivery couriers hanging phones from trees to get first in line for orders is the perfect encapsulation of the gig job market. A combination of human ingenuity, algorithms and sad.
Sources detail attempts by Amazon delivery drivers in Chicago to beat peers to new orders by hanging smartphones in trees near Amazon's delivery stations ( / Bloomberg)
This comparison is a bit off: “Much the way milliseconds can mean millions to hedge funds using robotraders, a smartphone perched in a tree can be the key to getting a $15 delivery route before someone else.” ht
#Amazon #delivery drivers are hanging smartphones in trees near Whole Foods to get an edge on other drivers in snagging routes that pay as little as $15, highlighting the competition for delivery work in a bleak job market.
This is some dystopian shit
Such a brutal story. The rise in demand for on-demand workers has begun, as it does in the wake of every recession. Contract delivery drivers are putting phones in trees to get a jump on rivals seeking orders, and subcontract work via
Fruits of capitalism.
The folk tradecraft of workers observing and assessing opaque algorithmic management systems then modifying their behavior in response is both heartbreaking and impressive "people's research."
It’s as (ir)rational as Wall Street high-frequency traders trying to locate their servers as physically close as possible to the stock exchange to goose a couple more nanoseconds of round-trip order-placing electron time. h/t
A strange phenomenon has emerged near Amazon delivery depots and Whole Foods stores in the Chicago suburbs: smartphones dangling from trees. is on the case.
Much the way milliseconds can mean millions to hedge funds using robotraders, a smartphone perched in a tree can be the key to getting a $15 delivery route before someone else, via via
Every time I think I have seen it all, a new wrinkle: digital #fissuredworkplace on steroids at #amazonflex. via
Very Regular Economy
Amazon Drivers Are Hanging Smartphones in Trees to Get More Work - Bloomberg
“Much the way milliseconds can mean millions to hedge funds using robotraders, a smartphone perched in a tree can be key to getting a $15 delivery route before someone else.” Amazon Drivers Are Hanging Smartphones in Trees to Get More Work in the Pandemic
latency arbitrage
A strange sight, explained: why trees outside Amazon/Whole Foods locations might be hiding smartphones in their branches. (hint: scammy drivers angling for an advantage.) via
“Much the way milliseconds can mean millions to hedge funds using robotraders, a smartphone perched in a tree can be the key to getting a $15 delivery route before someone else.”
This story from is something else Some $AMZN delivery drivers are hanging their smartphones in trees, so that they'll be in a better position to get the alert and snag jobs first
dismal story on Amazon drivers from () has haunting similarities to story on Instacart workers from () when an algorithm assigns desperately needed jobs, workers try anything (bots, trees) to go first
In Chicago suburbs, Amazon/Whole Foods contract delivery drivers are putting their cell phones in trees to get a jump on rivals seeking orders
High Frequency Driving
#HFT comes to food delivery.