I missed 2020 on this graph of western wildfire area burned at first, but there it is in the upper right hand corner nearly off the chart.
This record wildfire season for the West Coast is part of a long-term trend toward more frequent, more devastating fires in the West that shows no sign of slowing down. “We’ve broken almost every record there is to break,” said Daniel Swain of UCLA.
“If we could bar people from going into the forests and starting fires, that would help. If we could stop climate change, that would help. Better forest management would help. But right now, it combined into the perfect storm.”
One after another, major wildfires have exploded across California, Oregon and Washington earlier this month, adding up to the worst fire season on record — and more than a month of fire weather is still ahead.
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break.”
Climate change is expanding our fire season. If we don’t act now, our wildfires will continue to get larger and more frequent.
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break.”
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break.”
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break.”
Nearly 20 percent of Western wildfires this year are in areas that had burned as recently as 2000. “Reburn,” as called it, can happen after a year or two under “sufficiently extreme climate and weather conditions.”
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break,” said Daniel Swain of UCLA. This intense West Coast wildfire season is part of a long-term trend toward more frequent, more devastating fires in the region — one that shows no sign of slowing down.
This record wildfire season for the West Coast is part of a long-term trend toward more frequent, more devastating fires in the West that shows no sign of slowing down. “We’ve broken almost every record there is to break,” said Daniel Swain of UCLA.
This record wildfire season for the West Coast is part of a long-term trend toward more frequent, more devastating fires in the West that shows no sign of slowing down. “We’ve broken almost every record there is to break,” said Daniel Swain of UCLA.
Record Wildfires on the West Coast Are Capping a Disastrous Decade This is #climate change.
Climate change, drought, and outdated forest management driving most disastrous west coast fire season, with over 5 million acres burned.
“We’ve broken almost every record there is to break.”
A lot is in this piece. eg: Nearly a fifth of the Western wildfire this year has been on land that burned within the past two decades. “Reburn” can happen after a year or two under “sufficiently extreme climate and weather conditions," said.