Cronutt, a 7-year-old sea lion, underwent groundbreaking brain surgery to reverse his epilepsy, a condition that affects a growing number of sea mammals because of toxins in warming oceans. (Cronutt since ate 2 pounds of herring and is doing fine.)
Cronutt, a 7-year-old sea lion, underwent groundbreaking brain surgery to reverse his epilepsy, a condition that affects a growing number of sea mammals because of toxins in warming oceans. (Cronutt since ate 2 pounds of herring and is doing fine.)
Meet Cronutt - the first epileptic Cali sea lion to receive an MGE #interneuron transplant. Special thanks to everyone who came together to make this a reality and so many others.
He washed up on beaches along the California coast repeatedly. Someone tried to feed him a burrito. He wouldn't let beachgoers use a bathroom. Then he started having seizures, signs of a brain injury brought on by the effects of climate change.
You'll be rooting for Cronutt the sea lion by the end of this story
Three delightful things (MGE cell transplantation, sea lions, and graduate John Andrews) all wrapped up in one story!
Finally, a scalable solution to ameliorate the effects of climate change on marine wildlife: injecting stem cells from a pig brain into the hippocampus of a sea lion.
Novel Brain Surgery Seeks to Reverse Epilepsy in Sea Lion (an interesting tale on several levels)