No one can say how a climate-induced housing crash might end. But researchers at Wharton think they've figured out how it starts.
Economists have long worried that climate change will hurt coastal home values. New data suggest it's already started.
Canary in the coal mine: climate change impacts on Florida home sales has been visible since 2013 and its impact on prices started emerging in 2017. Source:
Climate change is eroding one of the most vibrant real estate markets in the country — and has quietly been doing so for nearly a decade, according to new research.
“Coastal housing is in more distress than we thought.” In Florida, climate woes are already hurting home demand in low-lying areas, new research suggests.
“Not only is climate change eroding one of the most vibrant real estate markets in the country, it has quietly been doing so for nearly a decade.” ⁦⁩ drawing on ⁦⁩ & co
Come for the careful empirical work on climate change starting to affect the real estate market, stay for the Florida real estate agents and mayors who deny it's happening. Via
Climate change, far from being a distant threat, is already starting to hurt real estate values. “I think the fundamental reason is the increase of home buyers’ awareness of the risk.” The latest from
I've been lucky enough to collaborate with the amazing on a few stories about climate change in Florida, and the images in today's piece are predictably gorgeous.
Via "Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis" (something we wrote about last year in :
The brittleness bubble is on the verge of popping. "The question... is how soon, and how quickly, people will respond to risk by... fleeing the market.... climate change, far from being a distant threat, is already starting to hurt real estate values."
Economists have long worried that climate change will hurt coastal home values. New data suggest it's already started.
Climate-driven sea level rise means that, for states like Florida, the #climatecrisis is a housing crisis too. Climate change touches everything. We must empower leaders who will act on science to keep us safe from this crisis.
Signs of a slow-motion crash taking place in high-end Florida real estate: you can choose to deny climate change, but the market won’t
Florida’s got a big problem as the sea rises. Are home-buyers getting wise to that? (Yes.) If so, where? By
Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis
Good thing we started talking about EXACTLY this at AmeriCatalyst 2016. And 2017. Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis - The New York Times
If you read ⁦⁩ book The Water Will Come, the findings in this article will come as no surprise. Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis - The New York Times
Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis #RealEstate #Florida #ClimateChange #housing
Homes exposed to sea level rise showing signs of price drops in Florida
There are two stories here: The first is the growing evidence that #climatechange is already driving a drop in sales & value of homes at higher risk of sea-level rise. The second is the blind denial of this evidence by politicians and real-estate agents.
A new study finds suggestive evidence that rising sea levels are already starting to erode home sales and prices in low-lying areas in Florida. by
The penny drops. Don’t buy a house on the beach - The New York Times
Florida sees signals of #climate-driven housing crisis: Home sales in areas most vulnerable to sea-level rise began falling around 2013 and prices are now following, according to new research. One to watch...
Climate change has been eroding one of the most vibrant real estate markets in the country ... for nearly a decade.
Quantities falling in areas exposed to rising water. Like other bubbles, quantities decline before prices. Fascinating new work by and Mulder
It will be fascinating to watch this play out over the next decade or two. I wonder if there will be a tipping point or mass exodus as "smart" money heads for the hills, so to speak.
The surprising thing about this research is not that some people are acting rationally, it’s that so many people (including some of FL’s mayors, apparently) are acting so irrationally.
Lots more of this coming at us, unfortunately. Florida Sees Signals of a Climate-Driven Housing Crisis - The New York Times