Back in March, a study on how long the coronavirus lasts on surfaces fueled what one author called “the great fomite freakout.” People scrubbed everything from mail to groceries. It's time to reassess. Here’s what we now know about surface spread 1/
Science has changed. Behavior is a good bit slower. Aka why people are still wiping down their groceries (which you don't need to do)
Your periodic reminder that lots of time, energy and money is spent on sanitizing surfaces, which does little to stop the chiefly respiratory spread of COVID-19. via
Of course, low risk is not no risk. There are high-touch objects that merit disinfection. People at high risk from Covid-19 may want to take extra precautions. But the best advice for breaking that object-to-nose chain? Wash your hands 12/
Fantastic piece on what we know about surface transmission of COVID—Like I am hoping this means the crime scene tape will soon come down from our playgrounds!
It’s Time to Talk About #Covid19 and Surfaces Again In the early days, we furiously scrubbed, afraid we could get sick from the #coronavirus lingering on objects and surfaces. What do we know now? via
“now she had done the research, and she knew the biggest risk in a library is the risk of sharing the same air, not touching the same book” — nice long form article covering how we moved from the ‘great fomite freakout’ to embrace the idea of ‘shared air’
I wrote about weeklong book quarantines and overzealous pew disinfection for . It's a look at what we've learned about the science of surfaces and Covid since March, when I and others wrote about the early research ("The Great Fomite Freakout")
This was a worthwhile read.
“The chance of transmission through inanimate surfaces is very small, and only in instances where an infected person coughs or sneezes on the surface, and someone else touches that surface soon after the cough or sneeze (within 1–2 h).”
There once was a panicked population For whom fomites caused great consternation But surfaces hardly spread covid Make your cleaning more languid More important are masks and ventilation via
"the chance of transmission through inanimate surfaces is very small, and only in instances where an infected person coughs or sneezes on the surface, and someone else touches that surface soon after the cough or sneeze (within 1–2 h)” via
It’s Time to Talk About Covid-19 and Surfaces Again: In the early days, we furiously scrubbed, afraid we could get sick from the virus lingering on objects and surfaces. What do we know now? via
4/ Now Example #2: We also now know that the risks of covid-19 spread on surfaces were also exaggerated
To stay sane during the pandemic, we have to pick our battles. Which behaviors should we avoid at all costs? And which are so low-risk that they're not worth worrying about? The best evidence now suggests that surface contamination is *not* a big risk.
The risk of surface transmission of COVID19 has always seemed overblown and implausible – we'd be seeing more cases and mask mandates would not be working as well. We also know a lot more F2F contact causing it. WIRED on a lot of research confirming this
I'm interested in this subject, but I really need a tl;dr for this article.