One of the greatest paradoxes in American life is that, while existence has gotten more comfortable over time, happiness has fallen. Find out why, and what you can do about it in your own life, in my “How to Build a Life” column in today’s .
"One of the greatest paradoxes in American life is that while, on average, existence has gotten more comfortable over time, happiness has fallen.”
One of the greatest paradoxes in American life is that while, on average, existence has gotten more comfortable over time, happiness has fallen. In How to Build a Life, theorizes about why that might be
.⁦⁩: “One of the greatest paradoxes in American life is that while, on average, existence has gotten more comfortable over time, happiness has fallen.” v ⁦
"The world encourages us to love things and use people. But that’s backwards. Put this on your fridge and try to live by it: Love people; use things." -- Another indispensable column from
Three pieces of advice I give on how to get happier in modern life in today’s “How to Build a Life” column : 1. Don’t buy that thing. 2. Don’t put your faith in princes (or politicians). 3. Don’t trade love for anything. See if you agree.
The world encourages us to love things and use people. But that’s backwards. Put this on your fridge and try to live by it: Love people; use things. See today’s “How to Build a Life” column .
This is from Yes, I suppose if you cherry-pick your starting point, and assume that a change of any size is significant, you can interpret a flat line as a “trend”.