My new essay in on the misuse and abuse of 'fascist.' In using the word to describe Trump and his supporters, Americans have lost moral clarity. Words aren't just postmodern markers. They should mean something
NYTimes staff freaks out over Sen. Cotton's call for order as "fascism" leading to editor resignation. Then it posts a justification for actual (Chinese) fascism: w/repression, internments, rape-by-policy, and ethnic cleansing. NYT staff? Silence.
God bless you for writing this piece. “Moral clarity requires us to seek both accuracy and proportion. Anything less does a disservice to those who have actually struggled, fought, and died against fascism.”
"Americans are not unusual in caring less about tragedies in countries other than their own. The atrocities committed against the Uighurs, however, attract less attention than they should in part because of whom they’re committed by," writes
If you missed it, my latest for : “Moral clarity requires us to seek both accuracy and proportion. Anything less does a disservice to those who have actually struggled, fought, and died against fascism”
“If Cotton is a fascist, then we don’t know what fascism is. And if we don’t know what fascism is, then we will struggle to identify it when it threatens millions of lives—which is precisely what is happening today in areas under Beijing’s control.”
“If Americans, even for just a moment, could look beyond Trump, they might realize that another world—one where fascism is a living, breathing thing—awaits them.” Long overdue piece c/o ⁦⁩ on the stupid, hyperventilating age we live in.
'The atrocities committed against the Uighurs... attract less attention than they should in part because of whom they’re committed by. Getting large numbers of people genuinely worked up about what China does is difficult." --
. writes this terrific piece on how we need to apply weighted terms like fascism only where truly appropriate but, when it happens, urgently highlight those truly suffering from it, as with the Chinese government’s treatment of the Uighurs.
Perhaps ⁦⁩ could have read the *book* in which I defend the use of the term “fascist”, or ⁦⁩ book or at least dimly followed the fascism debate? This is shocking ⁦⁩ - do better.
This piece by is important, timely and sends shivers down my spine especially this paragraph about the genocide in #Xinjiang is chilling.
This is an excellent and important essay by , which argues that Americans are losing sight of what fascism means.
Without dismissing real dangers, this piece makes a good case why Trump opponents should resist the temptation to emulate his tabloid ways
Critical insights from here. Getting people genuinely worked up about what China does is difficult, but if Americans could look beyond Trump, they might realize that another world—one where fascism is a living, breathing thing—awaits them.
. with a timely, spot-on call to transcend our own hypocrisy and see true darkness: "Outrage is always selective. Why did readers infuriated by Cotton’s argument seem to shrug off Ip’s? If Cotton is a fascist, we don’t know what fascism is..."
An excellent piece from . We must not forget what words actually mean, or succumb to an entirely U.S.-centric worldview, because it hurts our ability to identify and fight the worst iterations of authoritarianism worldwide.
Don't miss writing in about the disconnect btwn our nation's outrage over theoretical fascism at home, and the fascism in fact happening now in areas under Beijing’s control:
Excellent, immensely important from : We must stop the faux moral outrage & regain clarity. We must remember what words (like #fascism) actually mean, otherwise we risk failing to identify them when & where they appear — like in #China today
One of the best pieces I’ve read recently. writes on how fascism actually looks like. Excellent
"Sometimes, life is elsewhere. In some places, democracy, or what’s left of it, is truly under threat. One of those places is Hong Kong." --
My new essay in is out today
.⁦⁩: Words matter because they help order our understanding of politics both at home and abroad. If Tom Cotton is a fascist, then we don’t know what fascism is, and will struggle to identify it when it threatens millions of lives.
"Moral clarity requires us to seek both accuracy and proportion. Anything less does a disservice to those who have actually struggled, fought, and died against fascism." Every word of this, says journo appalled by craven partisan labeling, via
“'Regina Ip’s Op-Ed,' the statement (read), 'allowed our readers to hear another side of the debate from a member of the Executive Council of Hong Kong.' Yet Ip’s piece was less a reasoned argument than an explicit assertion of Beijing’s right to repress."
“This time, though, no staff revolt occurred, even though Ip’s article was an elaborate, if refreshingly frank, endorsement of real fascism.”
Former NYT editorial board member: “Is the United States better, worse, or the same as China?… In 2020, this is becoming a genuinely difficult question to answer.” "Genuinely difficult."