Want to know how to green the grid? The you should understand how your state makes electricity. Brillint piece by the dream team of & , and one that I will come back to again and again for reference.
“We’re going to continue to see coal plants retire,” said Kate Konschnik of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. “The big question now is whether those plants get replaced with gas or cleaner energy.”
The future of the nation’s energy mix has become a major election issue. But America isn’t making electricity the way it did two decades ago.
PresidentTrump pushed to weaken regulations on industry, but more coal power plants closed during his first term than in the last four years of Barack Obama’s presidency.
“We’re going to continue to see coal plants retire,” said Kate Konschnik of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. “The big question now is whether those plants get replaced with gas or cleaner energy.”
We charted the big shifts in American electricity so far, state-by-state. 50 little stories in 50 charts! Find yours here
President Trump pushed to weaken regulations on industry, but more coal power plants closed during his first term than in the last four years of Barack Obama’s presidency.
How Does Your US State Make Electricity? Incredible work from the
This NYT DataVis from and shows so clearly the changes that have taken place in the US electricity system: 1. Much more gas (less coal & nuclear) 2. The first non-hydro renewables states More wind + solar states on the way? 👀
“We’re going to continue to see coal plants retire,” said Kate Konschnik of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. “The big question now is whether those plants get replaced with gas or cleaner energy.”
America isn’t making #electricity the way it did two decades ago. The future of our energy mix is now an #election issue. See where your state stands. Great #journalism by #ClimateAction
Love these graphics by on how the electricity mix has been changing in every state. Lots of big shifts even in the past few years
How Does Your State Make Electricity? "Last year, Ohio generated more electricity from natural gas than from coal for the first time in its history. "
Bump charts for the win
What do people think about this type of visual presentation? It's a variation on stacked graphs that shows changes in ordinal rank. I kind of like it, but i worry that it makes small changes appear really large... (From )
Love the charts in this NYT piece about how each state generates its electricity.
How Does Your State Make Electricity?